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NEUROMODULATION

What is Neuromodulation?

Neuromodulation is a term for therapies that use electrical impulses or medication to alter the activity of diseased or injured nerves. By stimulating the nerves with electricity, their activity can be modulated, increasing their signaling abilities or fully blocking them.

Nerves within the spine, ganglion nerves, and peripheral nerves can all be affected. In the case of pharmaceutical treatment, pumps are placed within the body to deliver a constant dose of medication to the affected areas.

These methods are successful in treating a large range of neurologic disorders, including but not limited to urinary incontinence, Parkinson’s disease, and ischemic disorders. Here at Loop Medical Center, we offer a variety of neuromodulation treatments for headaches, tremors, spinal cord damage, and chronic pain. These therapies provide alternatives for treatments such as the use of high-dose opioids and invasive surgery.

TREATMENTS

Spinal Cord Stimulation (SCS)

Spinal cord stimulation is a good treatment option for individuals with chronic lower back and extremity pain that have not found relief from other therapies or who do not wish to continue a regimen of repeat nerve blocks. It is most successful for patients with pain due to failed back surgery syndrome, Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) Types I and II, intractable low back pain, and leg pain. A small device, similar to a pacemaker, is placed within the body.

Once implanted, it sends small electrical impulses through to the spine, masking pain signals from other nerves. This method does not eliminate the source of pain but, instead, blocks the sensation so that the patient feels less of it. The device is programmed to provide each patient with settings that are best suited to their condition. Before a permanent stimulator device is placed in the body, patients are able to trial an external version.

The amount of relief provided varies from person to person and, if the trial stimulator is unsuccessful, it can easily be removed and the patient can pursue other forms of treatment.

Plastic model of spine on table of osteopath
Physical therapists are examining the patient's body.

Dorsal Root Ganglion (DRG) Stimulation

Similar to spinal cord stimulators (SCS), patients can receive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) stimulators, devices that interfere with pain signaling from the DRG, an easy to reach structure in the spine that contains a large amount of sensory nerves. This device is used to treat pain signaling from areas that are difficult to treat through SCS, such as within the hands, groin, knee, chest, or abdomen.

This method does not eliminate the source of pain but, instead, blocks the sensation so that the patient feels less of it. The device is programmed to provide each patient with settings that are best suited to their condition. In addition, patients are given a remote that they can use to control their DRG stimulator, allowing them to further personalize their settings and receive the most relief possible.

Before a permanent stimulator device is placed in the body, patients are able to trial an external version. The amount of relief provided varies from person to person and, if the trial stimulator is unsuccessful, it can easily be removed and the patient can pursue other forms of treatment.

Dorsal Root Ganglion (DRG) Stimulation

Similar to spinal cord stimulators (SCS), patients can receive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) stimulators, devices that interfere with pain signaling from the DRG, an easy to reach structure in the spine that contains a large amount of sensory nerves. This device is used to treat pain signaling from areas that are difficult to treat through SCS, such as within the hands, groin, knee, chest, or abdomen.

This method does not eliminate the source of pain but, instead, blocks the sensation so that the patient feels less of it. The device is programmed to provide each patient with settings that are best suited to their condition. In addition, patients are given a remote that they can use to control their DRG stimulator, allowing them to further personalize their settings and receive the most relief possible.

Before a permanent stimulator device is placed in the body, patients are able to trial an external version. The amount of relief provided varies from person to person and, if the trial stimulator is unsuccessful, it can easily be removed and the patient can pursue other forms of treatment.

Physical therapists are examining the patient's body.

Peripheral Nerve Stimulation

Similar to spinal cord stimulators (SCS), patients can receive peripheral nerve stimulators (PNS), devices that interfere with chronic pain signaling from nerves located outside of the spine. PNS is used to treat chronic pain due to damaged peripheral nerves, migraines, and overactive bladder.

This method does not eliminate the source of pain but, instead, blocks the sensation so that the patient feels less of it. The device is programmed to provide each patient with settings that are best suited to their condition. Before a permanent stimulator device is placed in the body, patients are able to trial an external version.

The amount of relief provided varies from person to person and, if the trial stimulator is unsuccessful, it can easily be removed and the patient can pursue other forms of treatment.

Active nerve cells

Peripheral Nerve Stimulation

Similar to spinal cord stimulators (SCS), patients can receive peripheral nerve stimulators (PNS), devices that interfere with chronic pain signaling from nerves located outside of the spine. PNS is used to treat chronic pain due to damaged peripheral nerves, migraines, and overactive bladder.

This method does not eliminate the source of pain but, instead, blocks the sensation so that the patient feels less of it. The device is programmed to provide each patient with settings that are best suited to their condition. Before a permanent stimulator device is placed in the body, patients are able to trial an external version.

The amount of relief provided varies from person to person and, if the trial stimulator is unsuccessful, it can easily be removed and the patient can pursue other forms of treatment.

Active nerve cells
loop-medical-center-pain-clinic-Neuromodulation-Intrathecal-Pumps1

Intrathecal Pumps

Intrathecal pumps, also known as pain pumps, are placed within the body to administer medications, such as pain medications or antibiotics, directly to the spinal cord. Since the medications are not consumed by mouth, they do not need to be metabolized and, instead, immediately reach their target. Therefore, lower doses are needed to achieve the desired effects, resulting in fewer side effects and quicker action.

This treatment is most successful for patients with inflammation of the protective layers surrounding nerves, pancreatitis, pain due to peripheral nerve injury, cancer pain, and failed back surgery syndrome. The pump slowly delivers medicine and can be programmed to deliver different amounts at different times of day, allowing for each patient to have their own personalized regimen, specific to their needs.

BOOK CONSULT

Intrathecal Pumps

Intrathecal pumps, also known as pain pumps, are placed within the body to administer medications, such as pain medications or antibiotics, directly to the spinal cord. Since the medications are not consumed by mouth, they do not need to be metabolized and, instead, immediately reach their target. Therefore, lower doses are needed to achieve the desired effects, resulting in fewer side effects and quicker action.

This treatment is most successful for patients with inflammation of the protective layers surrounding nerves, pancreatitis, pain due to peripheral nerve injury, cancer pain, and failed back surgery syndrome. The pump slowly delivers medicine and can be programmed to deliver different amounts at different times of day, allowing for each patient to have their own personalized regimen, specific to their needs.

BOOK CONSULT
loop-medical-center-pain-clinic-Neuromodulation-Intrathecal-Pumps1
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