skip to Main Content

DISC DECOMPRESSION

Doctor showing various spinal sections showing intervertebral disc space disease

What is Disc Decompression?

In between spinal vertebrae, there are discs, gel-like cushions that allow for spinal mobility, act as shock absorbers, and hold the spine together. As individuals age, these discs dry out, becoming stiff and less flexible. In addition, this degeneration can occur due to injury. In either case, the discs can begin to bulge outwards, increasing inflammation and stress on nearby nerves. In some individuals, this can be painful.

In order to relieve the symptoms, individuals can undergo treatments that stretch the spine, removing pressure from the degenerating disc(s). This also allows water and other nutrients to return to the disc, allowing it to heal. Here at Loop Medical Center, we offer minimally invasive lumbar decompression (MILD), percutaneous disc decompression, and vertiflex procedures.

TREATMENTS

Minimally Invasive Lumbar Decompression (MILD)

Individuals with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS)<, narrowing of the spinal canal and compression of nerves, may benefit from minimally invasive lumbar decompression (MILD). LSS occurs naturally with age but can also be due to injury. It is associated with weakness, pain, cramping, and numbness in the legs.

During MILD procedures, excess spinal bone and damaged ligaments are removed, providing more spice within the spinal canal. In doing so, excess pressure on the nerves is minimized, reducing pain and increasing mobility. This outpatient, minimally invasive procedure has been shown to increase the amount of time that LSS patients can walk and remain standing. Vertiflex procedures are another option for LSS patients.

loop-medical-center-pain-clinic-disc-decompression-Minimally-Invasive-Lumbar-Decompression
Doctor explaining various spine diseases by the example of plastic models

Percutaneous Disc Decompression

In between spinal vertebrae, there are discs, gel-like cushions that allow for spinal mobility, act as shock absorbers, and hold the spine together. With age or injury, these discs can begin to bulge outwards, increasing inflammation and stress on nearby nerves.

When this occurs with discs in the lower region of the spine, the sciatic nerve can be injured, causing sciatica. In these instances, patients usually experience pain in the legs or feet that may be alleviated by a percutaneous disc decompression. During this minimally invasive procedure, small amounts of the disc tissue are removed, relieving pressure on the nearby sciatic nerve.

This treatment is most successful in patients with discs that are mildly compressed and have not ruptured. Most people that undergo percutaneous disc decompression note that their pain is relieved almost immediately following surgery.

Percutaneous Disc Decompression

In between spinal vertebrae, there are discs, gel-like cushions that allow for spinal mobility, act as shock absorbers, and hold the spine together. With age or injury, these discs can begin to bulge outwards, increasing inflammation and stress on nearby nerves.

When this occurs with discs in the lower region of the spine, the sciatic nerve can be injured, causing sciatica. In these instances, patients usually experience pain in the legs or feet that may be alleviated by a percutaneous disc decompression. During this minimally invasive procedure, small amounts of the disc tissue are removed, relieving pressure on the nearby sciatic nerve.

This treatment is most successful in patients with discs that are mildly compressed and have not ruptured. Most people that undergo percutaneous disc decompression note that their pain is relieved almost immediately following surgery.

Doctor explaining various spine diseases by the example of plastic models

Vertiflex

Individuals with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS), narrowing of the spinal canal and compression of nerves, may benefit from Vertiflex procedures. Due to arthritis, LSS occurs naturally with age but can also be due to injury. It is associated with weakness, pain, cramping, and numbness in the legs.

During this minimally invasive procedure, a small device is placed between spinous processes: thin, bony projections on the back of the spine. Doing so creates more space in the spinal canal and relieves pressure from nearby nerves. Unlike other procedures, such as MILD, no bone or ligaments are removed.

This leads to quick recovery and less trauma to muscles and other structures.

BOOK CONSULT
Close up of nurse showing spine bones on human skeleton for diagnosis presentation of senior patient. Medical assistant explaining spinal cord to old man for physical recovery and remedy
Back To Top